Tuesday, 29 September 2015

Toyota to 3D Print Lightweight Car Seat

When the automobile moguls at Toyota Motor Corporation decided that they wanted to produce a prototype for a car seat that was as lightweight as possible, they found themselves face to face with a complex project that was meant to be handled by 3D printing technology. How would the Toyota team possibly design, build, and manufacture such a complex and sizable 3D printed car seat? That’s where Belgium-based 3D printing service bureau and software developer Materialise and their enthusiastic engineering team came in.


Using a specialized method of topology optimization, Toyota and Materialise were able to assign various levels of density to the car seat design before transforming it into a 3D model. The lower density areas were then populated in Materialise’s 3-maticSTL software, which allowed for design modification, repair, and simplification of the car seat’s 3D files. The 3-maticSTL method was also utilized to remove unnecessary print material and add comfort to the seat through the placement of a pattern of elastic beams to the surface of the prototype.

The design itself is filled with so many complex patterns and unit cells that Materialise had to use their slice-based operations technology, which allows designers to apply texture and structure to gigantic, unmanageable STL files. Materialise’s procedure works by skipping over the general STL file stage of design and directly builds the geometric patterns onto the 3D slices, creating a large-scale model that would have been impossible to design without their innovative slice-based operations process.

Elastic beam pattern created with the 3-maticSTL process

The efforts of Toyota would have also been fruitless without the use of Materialise’s Build Processor, which works to simplify the 3D printing process by reestablishing large files into a much more manageable size. In the instance of the lightweight car seat prototype, the Build Processor cut the file size down from 250GB to just 36MB of metadata. Finally, the stage of rapid prototyping was performed by Materialise’s laser sintering technique, a manufacturing process geared towards producing a large amount of components in one shot, which is exactly what Toyota needed to create the large-scale prototype of their lightweight car seat.


Despite it’s size, the 3D printed prototype weighed just a staggering 7kg, and also reduced the heat capacity of the car seat from the standard 35.4 J/K (joule per kelvin) to just 14.5 J/K. With a big helping hand from Materialise’s engineers, Toyota was able to manufacture a car seat with a low volume that would have been unfathomable without the 3D printing process advancements implemented by Materialise. Their software and technology, combined with Toyota’s ambition to create the lightweight car seat prototype, is pointing the automobile industry in the direction of additive manufacturing, which as we can now see, can allow companies like Toyota to create complex prototypes that would have been impossible to design or manufacture without 3D printing innovators such as the Materialise team.

3D Printing Bureau services is available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D Service Bureau. Objective3D Service Bureau provides 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines provides the widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

Try out our INSTANT ONLINE QUOTE or for more details, visit www.objective3d.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)

3D printed windpipe improves girl's operation

A 3D-printed windpipe has been used to practise delicate surgery before an operation on a six-year-old girl at London's Great Ormond Street Hospital.



It meant doctors could pick the correct tools needed to wash her lungs.

And as a result, Katie Parke, from Northern Ireland, needed to spend less time under anaesthetic and being ventilated.

Doctors at the hospital say the technology could also be used to train other doctors.

Katie has pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, which means grainy deposits build up in the microscopic air sacs in her lungs making it hard to breathe.

Regularly washing the lungs with saltwater is the only way to remove the deposits.

During Katie's operation one of her lungs needed to be ventilated while the other was cleaned.

Normally, surgeons waste time on the operating table trying multiple combinations of different-sized tubes in order to perform the delicate surgery.

The team at Great Ormond Street Hospital used a CT scan of Katie to print out a 3D rubber model of Katie's trachea. They could then select the tools they needed ahead of the operation.

Katie's mum, Sharon Parke, said: "It's amazing to see what a tiny bit of kit can do. Katie's had brilliant treatment at Great Ormond Street and now she can even go horseriding, which was unthinkable before."

Owen Arthurs, a consultant radiologist who organised the study said: "We can look at a 3D reconstruction on a computer, but this takes it into a whole new dimension.

"Being able to hold it in your hand makes the procedure much easier and safer."

Doctors at Boston Children's Hospital, in the US, have also tried printing models of part of the brain ahead of surgery.

Dr Arthurs added: "It could also be used to make training better, being able to print a part of the anatomy is quite powerful. It's really important to train the next generation of doctors and make them better."

Stratasys 3D Printers are available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D, a complete 3D Printing Solutions provider. From 3D Printers, 3D Parts, 3D Scanners including Printer Maintenance services and consumables for Stratasys 3D printers, Objective3D is the largest distributor of Stratasys 3D Printers across Australia and New Zealand, and were recently awarded the Stratasys Customer Satisfaction and Support Award for 2013 for the Asia Pacific region. 

Objective3D is also a total solutions provider of 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines provides the widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

For more details, visit www.objective3d.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)

Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-34280641

Why 3D printing is the future of manufacturing, not just a cool gimmick

The next phase for 3D printing: Coming out of rapid prototyping and moving into the assembly line for end-use production.

Airbus has produced more than 1000 flight parts on 
Stratasys 3D printers for use in its A350 XWB aircraft.

New 3D printing processes have reduced the time it takes for designers and engineers to conceptualize, create, and test prototypes. But for 3D printing to catch on the rapidly changing manufacturing industry, it will have to be seen by companies less as a fascinating technological upgrade and more as an everyday business decision.

That’s the conclusion from a report published in August by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing, the service arm of the global 3D-printer manufacturing company Stratasys. SDM provides advanced manufacturing and prototyping services to manufacturing companies who might need a 3D-printed prototype or part, but lack the in-house equipment or staff expertise.

“Today 3D printing is still perceived as a technology solution, but the future of 3D printing is as a business solution,” wrote Joe Allison, CEO of SDM, in 3D Printing’s Imminent Impact on Manufacturing.


The report, pulled together survey responses given by 700 designers, engineers, and business executives, nearly half of whom work for manufacturing companies that pull in more than $50 million in revenue a year. Respondents came from the aerospace, medical, automotive, and energy industries, and all of them work for companies that are already using advanced manufacturing processes or plan to introduce things like 3D printing or direct metal laser sintering within three years. 

So what, exactly, does SDM mean in saying that additive manufacturing’s future is as a business solution? As Allison writes in the report, the growth in 3D printing over the next three years will come in “end-use” production.

“What we’re seeing now, and what our customers are doing … is using this technology all the way through the product lifecycle process,” said Jim Bartel, senior vice president of strategy, marketing, and business development for SDM. In a call with Fortune, Bartel said that participants in the survey are looking for the return on investment after purchasing 3D printing equipment and training the staff to use it. “Engineers are creating cool parts off their printers, but what it comes to is: What’s the business value?” he said.

In other words, the next phase of 3D printing development within manufacturing companies will involve bringing 3D printing out of the realm of rapid prototyping and into the assembly line, where additive processes are used to make parts that end up on the final product. This is already happening in some industries, and Stratasys has a direction connection to some of this work. In November 2014, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed parts 3D printed by Stratasys onto one of its satellites bound for outer space. Airbus is using Stratasys’ production-grade printers to print flight parts for its new A350 XWB airplane; the first one of these planes delivered in December 2014 had more than 1,000 3D-printed parts installed in it.

“Within 10 years, every commercial airplane will have 3D printed parts on it,” wrote Allison in the introduction to SDM’s new report.

To prepare for this shift in 3D printing, one that will see more companies using additive manufacturing, especially with metals, to manufacture end-use parts, companies are staffing up, training new workers, and buying more 3D printing machines, SDM’s report shows that 73% of the 700 respondents to SDM’s survey said their companies plan to increase their in-house production of additively manufactured parts, a trend more pronounced in the aerospace and medical industries. But Bartel said that, as companies increasingly turn to additive processes to manufacture end-use products, more outsourcing will be done by companies without the financial resources to purchase the equipment and train the staff. SDM’s report shows that more companies are planning to outsource additive metal production over the near-term.

And printing in metals is key. According to Bartel, SDM’s customers, especially those in the aerospace and medical fields, are asking for and using aluminum and titanium, lightweight metals with considerable material strength. SDM’s report bears this out: At 84%, respondents ranked metals as the leader when it comes to which materials they’d like to see developed further for additive manufacturing in the future. SDM predicts additive metal use overall to double in the next three years.

“If you wanted to print a full airplane wing, you could theoretically do it,” Bartel said.

SDM’s findings fit with some of the conclusions from this year’s Wohlers Report, the definitive, industry report on what’s happening with 3D printing and additive manufacturing worldwide. According to an analysis of the 2015 Wohlers Report by Engineering.com, ”the use of industrial metal additive manufacturing systems for demanding production applications in the aerospace and medical markets also grew strongly.” Worldwide, the market for additive manufacturing services and products grew to $4.1 billion in 2014, according to the Wohlers Report. And more growth is expected in coming years.

“People really have been looking at this [additive] technology historically more as a technology solution,” said Bartel, “but it’s now meeting business needs for customers.”

Stratasys Direct Manufacturing services is available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D Service Bureau. Objective3D Service Bureau provides 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines provides the widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

Try out our INSTANT ONLINE QUOTE or for more details, visit www.objective3d.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)

Source: http://fortune.com/2015/09/17/3d-printing-future-of-manufacturing/

Wednesday, 16 September 2015

3D Printing Gives Flight to Humanitarian Efforts


Stratasys Direct Manufacturing teamed with Structural Integrity Engineering to further efforts on the latest Flying Eye Hospital for Orbis. Orbis, an organization dedicated to providing ophthalmic training to communities around the world, utilizes airborne training facilities called Flying Eye Hospitals. Orbis’s goal is to eliminate unnecessary blindness, of which 39 million people around the global suffer from needlessly. In order to heal blindness, the Orbis team performs eye surgeries and educates doctors in the proper execution of eye surgeries through two-way audio-visual links. To aid and instruct as many people as possible, Orbis’ entire hospital and training facility is housed on a converted MD-10 aircraft. To further their efforts, Orbis began the process of building a new airborne hospital by reaching out to Structural Integrity Engineering, who then sought out Stratasys Direct Manufacturing for help manufacturing an air duct.

Structural Integrity Engineering (SIE) is an aerospace company that re-designs, re-builds and re-claims old and unused aircraft. One of the more complex components needed for new Flying Eye Hospital project was an air duct required to conform to certain curvatures as well as meet all FAA requirements for airflow. Its purpose is to filter air between the cockpit and the operating rooms. SIE chose to use a 3D Printing process to produce the air duct.

Mark Curran, Senior Engineer at SIE, has been working with additive manufacturing (3D Printing) processes for years, but always as a way to prototype and test out new parts using Stereolithography (SL). During design and form and fit testing, Curran and his team realized that traditional methods of manufacturing ducts would not be ideal for the geometry of the air duct needed on the Orbis plane.



“We had done work with Stratasys Direct Manufacturing in the past because 3D printing processes are very viable for complex fitting and design, which would normally cost quite a bit if machined,” says Curran. “In discussing our needs with Stratasys Direct Manufacturing Engineer Jesse, he informed me that Stratasys Direct Manufacturing has material that is FAA compliant for smoke and burn regulations. We received samples of the material, ULTEM, and did secondary burn tests. To pass, the samples have to extinguish by themselves within a certain amount of time. The ULTEM pieces passed the test.”

ULTEM is a thermoplastic material that has been engineered to meet very harsh environments, which is why the material has become widely used in the production of large vehicles such as automotives, industrial equipment and aircraft. “We took what we normally would’ve done in fiberglass and shifted our approach,” says Curran. Instead of fiberglass, Curran and his team chose to use 3D Printing process Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)coupled with the tan ULTEM material that worked so well for the team during testing. “We were able to design mounting feature attachment fittings into the actual part. The mounting features are usually separate. By designing them into the FDM ULTEM component, we were able to reduce our overall part count, which is always a good thing.” The success of the 3D Printed material and the ability of the process to consolidate parts was met with a lot of enthusiasm from Curran’s team.



FDM is an additive manufacturing process and works similar to a hot glue gun, extruding thermoplastics varying in degrees of durability, layer by layer, until a final product is achieved. The process, as Curran explained, allows for multiple features to be built into the actual completed product, opening up possibilities for designers to program-in virtually any feature they require. Had Curran and his team manufactured the duct using fiberglass, the machined mold and lay-up process would have taken weeks; with FDM, the team was able to receive their part in a matter of days, and should they need a replacement or an extra part, the team could receive multiple parts in just a few days.

Stratasys Direct Manufacturing proudly took on responsibility for ensuring the duct met FAA airworthiness certifications. Building a part that would be required to function on an actual aircraft (versus a prototype or non-critical part) required vigorous inspection by the FAA. The FAA sent two representatives to Stratasys Direct Manufacturing to test and certify the design and build of the air duct. First, a Designated Engineering Representative (DER), who is commissioned by the FAA and carries a legal license for engineering, visited Stratasys Direct Manufacturing to verify the design of the duct would meet airworthiness requirements. A Designated Airworthiness Representative (DAR), who inspects the part to ensure everything was built correctly and that the process used meets all airworthiness requirements, visited once the duct had been built. “Being responsible for FAA certifications opened our eyes to what additive manufacturing can accomplish,” stated Stratasys Direct Manufacturing’s Project Engineer Jesse Marin. “We’ve always been dedicated to internal research, and improving manufacturing processes, and I think it really paid off in this project.” Stratasys Direct Manufacturing successfully received an 8130 certification for their additive manufactured duct.


The Orbis team has never before used a 3D Printed unit on one of their Flying Eye Hospitals. The completed duct is 30” x 12.08” by 17.65” with a volume of 139.21.

An earlier prototype of the air duct has been awarded a place in the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) in Washington, D.C., to display the capabilities of 3D Printing and transfer those visionary and realistic ideas to the mainstream U.S. manufacturing sector.

Jack Mc Hal, MD 10 Program Director of Orbis International, commented that their objective “is to build the most sophisticated, technologically advanced, state of the art, gold standard hospital platform”; Stratasys Direct Manufacturing’s additive manufacturing was able to meet those standards.

Direct 3D Printing services is available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D Service Bureau. Objective3D Service Bureau provides 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines provides the widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

Try out our INSTANT ONLINE QUOTE or for more details, visit www.objective3d.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)

Monday, 14 September 2015

A Burst of 3D Printing Power: The New American Muscle Car

After re-locating to Michigan in 2011, Equus Automotive teamed up with Stratasys Direct Manufacturing to aid in the manufacturing of the prototype/pre-production BASS770. Equus’ model 770 defines a new iconic American muscle car. Beneath its brilliant exterior lies an amalgam of advanced manufacturing, including 3D Printing and cast urethanes. Stratasys Direct Manufacturing’s Stereolithography (SLA), Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), Laser Sintering (LS) and cast urethanes were used to build multiple interior and exterior components including the instrument panel, headlight and taillight bezels, HVAC ducting, glass trim panel fender, console covers, seat belt covers, under hood components, and more.



The majority of the components Stratasys Direct Manufacturing 3D Printed were used as master patterns for casting. Cast urethanes are an economical alternative to injection molding for projects requiring low volumes of parts. Cast urethanes begin with a 3D Printed or CNC’d master pattern. Once Stratasys Direct Manufacturing creates master patterns, the parts are treated to post-processing to achieve the desired surface finish. Then a silicone mold is formed around the master pattern. The mold is then cast with advanced polymer urethanes, revealing strong pre-production parts. The casted components were assembled onto Equus’ BASS770 after further finishing. Not all 3D Printed parts were used as master patterns; some components were 3D printed and then chromed or simply assembled on the car after post-processing. “We did the grille in FDM,” says Jordan Golden, Project Engineer at Stratasys Direct Manufacturing. “Equus used the grille for form, fit and aesthetic checks on their prototype model. We also created LS pieces that Equus chromed and used as different levers for seat adjustment.” Other 3D printed components were spin casted, such as the chrome lettering on the car. Many of the cast urethane components in the interior are leather wrapped. Stratasys Direct Manufacturing was thrilled to be included in the prototyping of such a spectacular car; the designers, engineers, modelers and builders that compose the genius team at Equus Automotives expanded the horizons of Stratasys Direct Manufacturing technologies.


This car is not just a nod to the iconic muscle cars of the 60s and 70s, but a burst of fresh manufacturing power into an at times stagnant industry. Equus showcases a firm hold on advanced technologies by coupling traditional cast urethanes with 3D Printing and the innovation to move a niche industry of American luxury vehicles forward.



What’s perhaps the main attraction of cast urethanes and 3D Printing for a luxury vehicle with 640 HP and a LS9 Supercharged 6.2L engine? Rudimentary: Optimum customization and full control of details with complete manufacturing done in the United States.

Stratasys Direct Manufacturing services is available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D Service Bureau. Objective3D Service Bureau provides 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines provides the widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

Try out our INSTANT ONLINE QUOTE or for more details, visit www.direct3dprinting.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)


Thursday, 10 September 2015

Get Your Design On – the Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge is Back!

 

Stratasys is pleased to announce the opening of the 12th Annual Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge (#ExtremeRedesign). Students of all levels from all over the world are eligible to enter our annual contest to create amazing new products or improve an existing product.

Last year’s competition drew more than 780 entries from 10 countries!

The contest categories include:

  • Engineering: Secondary Education (middle and high school)
  • Engineering: Post-Secondary (university, college or post-secondary)
  • Art and architecture (any grade level)

Last year's winners for Engineering: 
Post Secondary, Melanie Gralow and Lena Heemann, 
University of Bremen, for "Cooling With Heat"

This year there is an additional category for all age divisions: “Make a Difference.” Students are invited to create or modify a design that has the potential to be a force for change, like making an impact socially or economically, adding environmental friendliness, or increasing efficiency.

As an added bonus, if you’re a member school with NCATC (National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers), you’re eligible to be selected as the Coalition’s prize-winning top entry in the post-secondary category.

What Educators and Students Need to Know
Designs will be accepted to the 12th Annual Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge from September 2, 2015 through February 4, 2016.

Entries should be mechanically sound, realistic and achievable, and will be judged based on:

  • Mechanical design and part integrity
  • Compelling description (written and/or video)
  • Creative design
  • Product usefulness
  • Aesthetic appeal (art and architecture category)

Individual students or two-person teams are required to create designs using 3D CAD software. Each submission must have design files in .STL format sent to Stratasys, along with a written description (minimum 200 words) and/or a 30-second video explaining the value and benefit of the Extreme Redesign model.

A Rewarding Experience!
Each entrant into the Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge will receive a contest T-shirt. Semi-finalists will receive a model of their design produced on a Stratasys 3D Printer.

After the final round of judging from industry experts and Stratasys staff, the prizes will include:

  • $2,500 (USD) to first place in each category
  • $1,000 (USD) to second place in each category
  • US $1,500 (USD) to the winner of the “Make a Difference” bonus category. 


Additionally, the instructor of the first place student/team receives a limited-time demo Stratasys 3D Printer to use in the classroom. The winning design from a post-secondary NCATC member school will receive $1,000 (judged by NCATC).

As always, we at Objective3D and Stratasys are eagerly anticipating the thoughtful, useful and creative designs sparked by the Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge! For more information, contest rules and application instructions, visit the Extreme Redesign page.



Stratasys 3D Printers are available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D, a complete 3D Printing Solutions provider. From 3D Printers, 3D Parts, 3D Scanners including Printer Maintenance services and consumables for Stratasys 3D printers, Objective3D is the largest distributor of Stratasys 3D Printers across Australia and New Zealand, and were recently awarded the Stratasys Customer Satisfaction and Support Award for 2013 for the Asia Pacific region. 

Objective3D is also a total solutions provider of 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines provides the widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

For more details, visit www.objective3d.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)

Wednesday, 2 September 2015

3D printed modular self-defense outfits with integrated weaponry for women

Over the past year or two, the idea of 3D printed fashion has been exploding all over runways everywhere, but are 3D printed fashionable outfits and accessories really what the modern woman needs? Wouldn’t they be better off with an extra layer of 3D printed protection in today’s hostile and dangerous urban environments? That is, in a nutshell, what Nitzan Kish was thinking about while working on the 3D printing ‘Me, Myself & I’ project, which resulted in a gorgeous, yet slightly intimidating modular set of self-defense wearables for the modern women.

Fortunately, Nitzan was happy to answer a few of our questions regarding this fascinating project. As she explains, she has recently acquired her degree at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, in Jerusalem, and this project was her final project as part of her studies. ‘I am 29 year old. I'm a professional photographer,  a fashion designer and goldsmith,’ she tells us. ‘In the past three years I was an assistant teacher in 3D software and did tutoring for students in Bezalel Academy. I believe that through the 3D printing we will be able to create things that we could not create in any other way. I think that this is the next industrial revolution, and it will change the way we think and consume.’

And with this project, she certainly approaches 3D printed clothing from a very unusual perspective. While we’ve seen numerous examples of stylish clothing in the past, this set is functional and perfect for protecting yourself. As Nitzan explains, this project has drawn inspiration from her own childhood. ‘Since I was a child I was interested in self-defense. My father taught my brothers and I Karate and I also learned Ninzitzo,’ she tells us. ‘In my final project, I decided to externalize self-defense in a functional way in order to  make people think and ask questions about  self-defense for women: Why do we need it? Why do women have to wear armor when they go to the public sphere?’

While you might think this is somewhat exaggerated, a quick look at the harassment and violence statistics of Nitzan’s own Jerusalem (or any major city in the world) emphasizes that there really is something to this concept. ‘The harsh figures from Israel for 2014 attest to every woman suffering from sexual harassment.  One out of three women suffers a sexual assault and approximately 80% of women in Israel live in constant fear from sexual assault.  One out of every four women in Israel suffers an attempted rape,’ Nitzan says. ‘In a study published in May, 2015, 98% of sexual assaults were not reported at all, due to the lack of faith among most of the public in their police force and authorities.  This means – there is a problem, but there are no solutions from either the authorities or among the existing proposals for self-defense.’



Those shocking statistics really put this project in perspective, as Nitzan is simply trying to make a difference. ‘The answer is that at the moment there is no other choice. If we talk about these issues now, maybe we can educate the future generations, so we would not have to dress for self-defense,’ she says, but until that time a little 3D printed help might not be such as bad thing. What she has come up with is a set of modular 3D printed clothing solutions, all revolving around interlocking links that remain flexible but functional. ‘These links combine to form articles of clothing with a varied ability for movement:  a link that operates as a rope, flexicuffs or spike in strategic body locations (back and elbow).  The wearer can choose which options to use and can dissemble the entire article of clothing and wear parts of it as well,’ she explains. ‘Each part is composed of special links whose design optimally serves the means of defense for which they were created. Women around the world can print the items, wear all or parts of the cloth and be equipped with a ready means for self-defense and survival on their bodies.’

What’s more, to her knowledge and ours, there are currently no 3D printing projects out there that revolve around women’s self-defense and survival – though obviously there are some for 3D printing weapons and armor for cosplaying and larping purposes. As you can imagine, the design process for such extensive prints was time consuming. Design itself started in October 2014, with the final concepts being worked out digitally in February of this year. ‘The printing process was not easy. At first I designed a relatively simple links, and through them I learned the capabilities of 3D printers. At first I used Stratasys printer that are located in Bezale Academy and the printers of Synergy R.M. Company,’ she says – something all of us will be jealous of.


And as these objects are supposed to be somewhat durable after all, Nitzan eventually resorted to using Nylon 12, rather than the weaker plastics we are used to. ‘At this point in the process I created collaboration with ARAN Company. They helped me print many parts that will eventually fit the links the new material The printing time is difficult to assess because the process of printing the sheets takes several weeks,’ she adds. Fortunately, Nylon 12 is printed so well it hardly needs post-print processing, though she obviously experimented with several coloring options. At the end, she had assembled 24 different textile sheets, each featuring hundreds of different links.


So what’s the goal of these fascinating prints? Well its two-fold, really. At one side, there is the actual goal of protecting women everywhere, and for that reason Nitzan is planning to make her 3D printable files as available as possible through the web. ‘For women around the world, the accessibility and exposure to the project via an open or accessible code will enable them to print all or parts of the clothing with a 3D printer, offering them the possibility of self-defense, adapting the clothing to their needs and enabling them to react swiftly to what is occurring around them,’ she says.

But more importantly, Nitzan has realized that this project has also served to start discourses on women’s safety. ‘Increasing awareness on these matters enables women to understand that even in cases where they may have to cope with terrifying situations alone, they are not alone. We belong to a group with a common denominator that can grant enormous power to its individuals,’ she explains.


It’s therefore great to learn that Nitzan hasn’t stopped with this project, despite graduating successfully. Her dream is to continue this line of work in the form of clothing and accessories that can be worn by women everywhere, but that will obviously take a lot of time and effort to realize. ‘I have many ideas for accessories and outfit that can be used for the protection and survival of women that can be worn on different parts of the body,’ she concludes. In short, we will see a lot more of Nitzan’s interesting work in the near future.

Stratasys 3D Printers are available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D, a complete 3D Printing Solutions provider. From 3D Printers, 3D Parts, 3D Scanners including Printer Maintenance services and consumables for Stratasys 3D printers, Objective3D is the largest distributor of Stratasys 3D Printers across Australia and New Zealand, and were recently awarded the Stratasys Customer Satisfaction and Support Award for 2013 for the Asia Pacific region. 

Objective3D is also a total solutions provider of 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines providesthe widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

For more details, visit www.objective3d.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)

Article Source: www.3ders.org


Ship Shape Prototypes Produced 70% Faster with In-house 3D Printer

“To traditionally manufacture a prototype ship rudder in wood or plastic is a very skilled and labor-intensive job and typically takes up to three weeks to produce. With our Stratasys in-house 3D Printer, we can produce parts within a day, which after cleaning, are ready for final assembly." Michael Neumeier, Mechanical Design Engineer at Hamburg Ship Model Basin (HSVA)

Hamburg Ship Model Basin (HSVA), a German-based shipping and marine supplier, has reduced lead times for prototype ship model components by 70% and production costs by 30% by bringing Stratasys 3D printing in-house.

The Stratasys Objet Eden350V 3D Printer 
provides in-house production capabilities, reducing lead times by 70%.

Since the installation of its Objet Eden350V 3D Printer, the company has been able to quickly produce strong, high performance plastic prototype parts while reducing production costs and upholding high standards of quality and precision.

“A full-size ship is a complex geometric form with many complicated shapes that have to be re-produced true-to-scale,” explains Michael Neumeier, Mechanical Design Engineer at HSVA. “To traditionally manufacture a prototype ship rudder in wood or plastic is a very skilled and labor-intensive job and typically takes up to three weeks to produce. With our Stratasys in-house 3D Printer, we can produce parts within a day, which after cleaning, are ready for final assembly.

Assembly of a Stratasys 3D printed rudder, which can be 
produced much faster than with traditional fabrication methods

With in-house production capabilities, HSVA has far more flexibility to respond to last minute customer requests. For example, one of the most advanced marine propulsion systems is the azimuth propulsion drive (also known as “Pods”), typically very difficult to produce and assemble. The Pods features a strut which needs to be removed in order to change the gearbox.  A prototype design for the strut was 3D printed, allowing fast access and repair.

“Being able to print the various parts on our Stratasys 3D Printer makes assembly much easier. This has seen us slash lead times by as much as 70%, which has resulted in significant cost reduction of around 30%,” he adds.

3D printed rudder, produced in rigid opaque 
VeroGray material on the Stratasys Objet Eden350V 3D Printer

HSVA’s 3D printed components are produced using VeroGray, a rigid opaque material which provides excellent dimensional stability, finer details, and smooth surfaces.  A unique combination of extreme precision and high material strength enables VeroGray models to withstand the rigorous testing procedures undertaken by the company.

“The integration of our additive manufacturing solutions at HSVA in Germany and the incredible difference it is making to their design and production process is indicative of the efficiencies enjoyed by customers across a host of industries,” says Andy Middleton, President of Stratasys EMEA, “Material advancements in particular enable the production of tough, realistic prototypes that can endure rigorous functional testing during the development phase.”

The privately-managed and independent Hamburg Ship Model Basin (HSVA) has provided research and consultancy services to the worldwide maritime industry for over a century. The company has influenced and led developments of testing technology, methods, standardization and numerical procedures to solve complex hydrodynamical and structural problems during the development of new ships and other maritime objects. 

Stratasys 3D Printers are available in Australia and New Zealand from Objective3D, a complete 3D Printing Solutions provider. From 3D Printers, 3D Parts, 3D Scanners including Printer Maintenance services and consumables for Stratasys 3D printers, Objective3D is the largest distributor of Stratasys 3D Printers across Australia and New Zealand, and were recently awarded the Stratasys Customer Satisfaction and Support Award for 2013 for the Asia Pacific region. 

Objective3D is also a total solutions provider of 3D printing and custom manufacturing through the the largest additive manufacturing centre in the southern hemisphere - Objective3D Advanced Manufacturing Centre, powered by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing with 16 commercial grade machines provides the widest range of 3D printing technologies and materials to enable a broad range of specialist solutions.

For more details, visit www.objective3d.com.au or call 03-9785 2333 (AUS)  09-801 0380 (NZ)

Article source: Stratasys Blog