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Showing posts from September, 2011

Top Gear showcases Aussie JOSS!

Well Done Joss! It is a credit to this innovative Australian Company that their Supercar features in this month's issue of Top Gear.

The prototype of the JP1 was on display at this year's Melbourne Motor Show, as showcased in a story by Performance Drive (July 2, 2011).

Now Top Gear are giving this Aussie Supercar it's due credit.

RapidPro proudly built the wind tunnel prototype which featured alongside the full size vehicle at the 2011 Melbourne Motor Show.

The wind tunnel model was built using RedEye Australasia's Australian FDM Build Centre.


The model was made from ABS-M30, with a sparse fill interior. This ensured minimum cost for maximum return. The ABS-M30 prototype was then finished by JOSS to look like the full sized Super Car.

The total size of the completed prototype was 1000x400x300mm. It was built in six parts which were then chemically welded to ensure accuracy and strength for the extremes of wind testing.

To read more about JOSS visit their website, and get y…

Printing with the Sun!

Check out this 3D printer which uses the Sahara sun instead of a laser!

Markus Kayser's "Solar Sinter" is a working 3-D printer that uses the sun's rays to sinter solid objects of out desert sand.


Markus Kayser - Solar Sinter Project from Markus Kayser on Vimeo."In this experiment, sunlight and sand are used as raw energy and material to produce glass objects using a 3-D printing process that combines natural energy and material with high-tech production technology," he writes.

Sintering is a technical term for "melting powder into solid objects," and selective laser sintering is a common 3-D printing technique. Kayser realized that the world's most powerful laser is right above our heads, and to conduct his experiment at maximum sintering strength, he dragged his rig out into the Sahara Desert near Siwa, Egypt, and got to work.

The results aren't going to win any industrial design awards: the sintered sand congeals in craggy layers that look …

International Design Excellence Award winners

From an impressive line-up, Curve has highlighted just a few of the twenty-eight Gold IDEA winners for 2011.

To view the winners click here: Curve Online

Here's one that stood out to us:






Poetree by Margaux Ruyant, from the DSK ISD School of Design
in Pune, India, won Gold in the student category.



So what is it? Well, ashes are placed in the Poetree urn and covered with soil. The family takes the urn home, or to a desired location and plants a tree in it.


The tree and urn are planted, and over time all that is left is the ceramic top and tree, a living, permanent memorial to your loved one.


Well done Margaux, it is a wonderful, thoughtful idea with an environmental edge.

FDM prints an entire coffee table in one piece

In a recent article on imaterialise, a FDM printed modular coffee table was featured.

The Module, designed by celebrated designers WertelOberfell–Platform is printed in one piece on a Stratasys FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) Maxum machine.

The coffee table is based on fractal growth patterns in trees and designed specifically to minimize waste. Individual Module coffee tables can be intertwined in order to get just the size of table you need.

To watch the build click on the link below.



The machine used in the video is the Stratasys FDM Maxum, one of the largest 3D printers in existence with a build volume of 600 x 500 x 600 mm. Redeye Australasia has a Maxum on the premises and can make large scale prototypes in a single piece within Australia, reducing waiting time for parts to a maximum of a few days.

The Stratasys 900MC in RedEye's American Build Centre is capable of building prototypes as large as 914 x 610 x 914 mm and can supply them direct to Australia through the Australasian …